Houston, We Have A Problem: New Research Published about the EVAAS

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New VAM research was recently published in the peer-reviewed Education Policy Analysis Archives journal, titled “Houston, We Have a Problem: Teachers Find No Value in the SAS Education Value-Added Assessment System (EVAAS®).” This article was published by a former doctoral student of mine, turned researcher now at a large non-profit — Clarin Collins. I asked her to write a guest post for you all summarizing the fully study (linked again here). Here is what she wrote.

As someone who works in the field of philanthropy, completed a doctoral program more than two years ago, and recently became a new mom, you might question why I worked on an academic publication and am writing about it here as a guest blogger? My motivation is simple: the teachers. Teachers continue to be at the crux of the national education reform efforts as they are blamed for the nation’s failing education system and student academic struggles. National and state legislation has been created and implemented as believed remedies to “fix” this problem by holding teachers accountable for student progress as measured by achievement gains.

While countless researchers have highlighted the faults of teacher accountability systems and growth models (unfortunately to fall on the deaf ears of those mandating such policies), very rarely are teachers asked how such policies play out in practice, or for their opinions, as representing their voices in all of this. The goal of this research, therefore, was first, to see how one such teacher evaluation policy is playing out in practice and second, to give voice to marginalized teachers, those who are at the forefront of these new policy initiatives. That being said, while I encourage you to check out the full article [linked again here], I highlight key findings in this summary, using the words of teachers as often as possible to permit them, really, to speak for themselves.

In this study I examined the SAS Education Value-Added Assessment System (EVAAS) in practice, as perceived and experienced by teachers in the Southwest School District (SSD). SSD [a pseudonym] is using EVAAS for high-stakes consequences more than any other district or state in the country. I used a mixed-method design including a large-scale electronic survey to investigate the model’s reliability and validity; to determine whether teachers used the EVAAS data in formative ways as intended; to gather teachers’ opinions on EVAAS’s claimed benefits and statements; and to understand the unintended consequences that might have also occurred as a result of EVAAS use in SSD.

Results revealed that the reliability of the EVAAS model produced split and inconsistent results among teacher participants regardless of subject or grade-level taught. As one teacher stated, “In three years, I was above average, below average and average.” Teachers indicated that it was the students and their varying background demographics who biased their EVAAS results, and much that was demonstrated via their scores was beyond the control of teachers. “[EVAAS] depends a lot on home support, background knowledge, current family situation, lack of sleep, whether parents are at home, in jail, etc. [There are t]oo many outside factors – behavior issues, etc.” that apparently are not controlled or accounted for in the model.

Teachers reported dissimilar EVAAS and principal observation scores, reducing the criterion-related validity of both measures of teacher quality. Some even reported that principals changed their observation scores to match their EVAAS scores; “One principal told me one year that even though I had high [state standardized test] scores and high Stanford [test] scores, the fact that my EVAAS scores showed no growth, it would look bad to the superintendent.” Added another teacher, “I had high appraisals but low EVAAS, so they had to change the appraisals to match lower EVAAS scores.”

The majority of teachers disagreed with SAS’s marketing claims such as EVAAS reports are easy to use to improve instruction, and EVAAS will ensure growth opportunities for all students. Teachers called the reports “vague” and “unclear” and were “not quite sure how to interpret” and use the data to inform their instruction. As one teacher explained, she looked at her EVAAS report “only to guess as to what to do for the next group in my class.”

Many unintended consequences associated with the high-stakes use of EVAAS emerged through teachers’ responses, which revealed among others that teachers felt heightened pressure and competition, which they believed reduced morale and collaboration, and encouraged cheating or teaching to the test in attempt to raise EVAAS scores. Teachers made comments such as, “To gain the highest EVAAS score, drill and kill and memorization yields the best results, as does teaching to the test,” and “When I figured out how to teach to the test, the scores went up,” as well as, “EVAAS leaves room for me to teach to the test and appear successful.”

Teachers realized this emphasis on test scores was detrimental for students, as one teacher wrote, “As a result of the emphasis on EVAAS, we teach less math, not more. Too much drill and kill and too little understanding [for the] love of math… Raising a generation of children under these circumstances seems best suited for a country of followers, not inventors, not world leaders.”

Teachers also admitted they are not collaborating to share best practices as much anymore: “Since the inception of the EVAAS system, teachers have become even more distrustful of each other because they are afraid that someone might steal a good teaching method or materials from them and in turn earn more bonus money. This is not conducive to having a good work environment, and it actually is detrimental to students because teachers are not willing to share ideas or materials that might help increase student learning and achievement.”

While I realize this body of work could simply add to “the shelves” along with those findings of other researchers striving to deflate and demystify this latest round of education reform, if nothing else, I hope the teachers who participated in this study know I am determined to let their true experiences, perceptions of their experiences, and voices be heard.

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Again, to find out more information including the statistics in support of the above assertions and findings, please click here to read the full study.

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